4 Most Common Wrestling Injuries by Ben Becker, PA-C

February 12, 2021

With state wrestling just around the corner, gaining awareness on these common injuries is essential in the prevention of injuries, and treatment options if one occurs.
1.    Knee  injuries: Two of the most common ligament injuries that is seen during wrestling season include anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and medial collateral ligament (MCL) sprain, and meniscal tear. To prevent knee ligament injuries, wrestlers are encouraged to participate in strength-training exercises to increase the durability of ligaments. Also encouraged to stretch before and after activity to loosen ligament to help prevent injury.
2.    Pre-patellar Bursitis: To prevent pre-patellar bursitis, wrestlers are encouraged to use knee pads to help absorb the impact to the front of the patella (kneecap). Weight bearing and impact on the knees during wrestling practice and matches makes this a common form of bursitis. If swelling increases patella (kneecap) pain, recommend treatment with RICE (rest, icing, compression, and elevation).
3.    Shoulder dislocation: Impact with the mat, wrestling holds, and twisting of the arms and torso all may cause dislocation of the shoulder to occur during wrestling. To prevent dislocations, strength training, stretching, and weight lifting cane help to prevent this injury.
4.    Ankle Sprains: Wrestlers’ bodies are constantly maneuvering in unnatural ways, this can lead to the ankle giving away, and twisting causing injury. The severity of ankle sprain is based on the “degree” of the sprain. The first sign of sprain will be swelling, with bruising noted with a more severe sprain.  Control the swelling with RICE (rest, icing, compression, and elevation) Recommended that wrestlers stretch their ankles before a match in order to promote flexibility within the ligaments.
These are 4 of the common wrestling injuries athletes commonly experience. If you have experienced any of these or other wrestling injuries, contact Orthopedic clinic at ISH, at one of our many locations for further evaluation and treatment.
 

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