Osteomyelitis

November 1, 2019

Osteomyelitis   Osteo (bone), myelo (marrow), - itis (inflammation)

Osteomyelitis is an infection and inflammation of the bone or the bone marrow.  It can happen if a bacterial or fungal infection enters the bone tissue from the bloodstream due to injury or surgery.  In most cases, a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus, a type of staph bacteria, causes osteomyelitis. Only 2 out of every 10,000 people get osteomyelitis.  About 80 percent of cases develop because of an open wound. The condition affects children and adults, although in different ways.

In adults, osteomyelitis often affects the vertebrae and the pelvis.  In children, it usually affects the adjacent ends of the long bones or the main bones in the arms or legs.  Some people are more likely to experience osteomyelitis.  People at higher risk may have:

• A weakened immune system, due, for example , to chemotherapy or radiation treatment, malnutrition, dialysis, having a urinary catheter, injecting illegal drugs, and so on. 
• Circulatory problems, as a result of diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, or sickle cell disease.
• A deep puncture wound or a fracture that breaks the skin.
• Surgery to replace or repair bones.

Treatment for osteomyelitis depends on the type of osteomyelitis.  This usually involves antibiotics or anti-fungal medication, oral or intravenous.  Patients with chronic osteomyelitis usually need both antibiotics and surgery to repair any bone damage.

Symptoms also depend on the type of osteomyelitis but commonly include:

• Pain, which can be severe, swelling, redness, and tenderness in the affected area.
• Irritability, lethargy, or fatigue
• Fever, chills, and sweating
• Drainage from an open wound near the infection site or through the skin

The best way to prevent osteomyelitis is to keep things clean.  If you or your child has a cut, especially a deep cut, wash it completely.  Flush out any open wound under running water for 5 minutes, and then bandage it in sterile bandages.

If you have chronic myelitis, make sure your doctor knows about your medical history so you can work together to keep the condition under control.  If you have diabetes, pay close attention to your feet and contact your doctor at the first sign of possible infection.  The sooner you treat osteomyelitis, the better.

Osteomyelitis   Osteo (bone), myelo (marrow), - itis (inflammation)

Osteomyelitis is an infection and inflammation of the bone or the bone marrow.  It can happen if a bacterial or fungal infection enters the bone tissue from the bloodstream due to injury or surgery.  In most cases, a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus, a type of staph bacteria, causes osteomyelitis. Only 2 out of every 10,000 people get osteomyelitis.  About 80 percent of cases develop because of an open wound. The condition affects children and adults, although in different ways.

In adults, osteomyelitis often affects the vertebrae and the pelvis.  In children, it usually affects the adjacent ends of the long bones or the main bones in the arms or legs.  Some people are more likely to experience osteomyelitis.  People at higher risk may have:

• A weakened immune system, due, for example , to chemotherapy or radiation treatment, malnutrition, dialysis, having a urinary catheter, injecting illegal drugs, and so on. 
• Circulatory problems, as a result of diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, or sickle cell disease.
• A deep puncture wound or a fracture that breaks the skin.
• Surgery to replace or repair bones.

Treatment for osteomyelitis depends on the type of osteomyelitis.  This usually involves antibiotics or anti-fungal medication, oral or intravenous.  Patients with chronic osteomyelitis usually need both antibiotics and surgery to repair any bone damage.

Symptoms also depend on the type of osteomyelitis but commonly include:

• Pain, which can be severe, swelling, redness, and tenderness in the affected area.
• Irritability, lethargy, or fatigue
• Fever, chills, and sweating
• Drainage from an open wound near the infection site or through the skin

The best way to prevent osteomyelitis is to keep things clean.  If you or your child has a cut, especially a deep cut, wash it completely.  Flush out any open wound under running water for 5 minutes, and then bandage it in sterile bandages.

If you have chronic myelitis, make sure your doctor knows about your medical history so you can work together to keep the condition under control.  If you have diabetes, pay close attention to your feet and contact your doctor at the first sign of possible infection.  The sooner you treat osteomyelitis, the better.

Osteomyelitis   Osteo (bone), myelo (marrow), - itis (inflammation)

Osteomyelitis is an infection and inflammation of the bone or the bone marrow.  It can happen if a bacterial or fungal infection enters the bone tissue from the bloodstream due to injury or surgery.  In most cases, a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus, a type of staph bacteria, causes osteomyelitis. Only 2 out of every 10,000 people get osteomyelitis.  About 80 percent of cases develop because of an open wound. The condition affects children and adults, although in different ways.

In adults, osteomyelitis often affects the vertebrae and the pelvis.  In children, it usually affects the adjacent ends of the long bones or the main bones in the arms or legs.  Some people are more likely to experience osteomyelitis.  People at higher risk may have:

• A weakened immune system, due, for example , to chemotherapy or radiation treatment, malnutrition, dialysis, having a urinary catheter, injecting illegal drugs, and so on. 
• Circulatory problems, as a result of diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, or sickle cell disease.
• A deep puncture wound or a fracture that breaks the skin.
• Surgery to replace or repair bones.

Treatment for osteomyelitis depends on the type of osteomyelitis.  This usually involves antibiotics or anti-fungal medication, oral or intravenous.  Patients with chronic osteomyelitis usually need both antibiotics and surgery to repair any bone damage.

Symptoms also depend on the type of osteomyelitis but commonly include:

• Pain, which can be severe, swelling, redness, and tenderness in the affected area.
• Irritability, lethargy, or fatigue
• Fever, chills, and sweating
• Drainage from an open wound near the infection site or through the skin

The best way to prevent osteomyelitis is to keep things clean.  If you or your child has a cut, especially a deep cut, wash it completely.  Flush out any open wound under running water for 5 minutes, and then bandage it in sterile bandages.

If you have chronic myelitis, make sure your doctor knows about your medical history so you can work together to keep the condition under control.  If you have diabetes, pay close attention to your feet and contact your doctor at the first sign of possible infection.  The sooner you treat osteomyelitis, the better.

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